SICP: A quick note about Exercise 1.28

It’s been 5 years since I’ve written something on SICP–almost to the day! I recently provided some assistance to a reader of my blog on this exercise. In the process, I of course had to understand something about it. Like with Exercise 1.19, I didn’t think this one was written that clearly. It seemed like the authors assumed that the students were familiar with the Miller-Rabin test, or at least modular mathematics.

The exercise text made it sound like one could implement Miller-Rabin as a modification to Fermat’s Little Theorem (FLT). From providing my assistance, I found out that one could do it as a modification to FLT, though the implementation looked a bit convoluted. When I tried solving it myself, I felt more comfortable just ignoring the prior solutions for FLT in SICP, and completely rewriting the expmod routine. Along with that, I wrote some intermediate functions, which produced results that were ultimately passed to expmod. My own solution was iterative.

I found these two Wikipedia articles, one on modular arithmetic, the other on Miller-Rabin, to be more helpful than the SICP exercise text in understanding how to implement it. Every article I found on Miller-Rabin, doing a Google search, discussed the algorithm for doing the test. It was still a bit of a challenge to translate the algorithm to Scheme code, since they assumed an imperative style, and there is a special case in the logic.

It seemed like when it came right down to it, the main challenge was understanding how to calculate factors of n – 1 (n being the candidate tested for primality), and how to handle the special case, while still remaining within the confines of what the exercise required (to do the exponentiation, use the modulus function (remainder), and test for non-trivial roots inside of expmod). Once that was worked out, the testing for non-trivial roots turned out to be pretty simple.

If you’re looking for a list of primes to test against your solution, here are the first 1,000 known primes.

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