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Archive for December, 2015

I was taken with this interview on Reason.tv with Mr. O’Neill, a writer for Spiked, because he touched on so many topics that are pressing in the West. His critique of what’s motivating current anti-modern attitudes, and what they should remind us of, is so prescient that I thought it deserved a mention. He is a Brit, so his terminology will be rather confusing to American ears.

He called what’s termed “political correctness” “conservative.” I’ve heard this critique before, and it’s interesting, because it looks at group behavior from a principled standpoint, not just what’s used in common parlance. A lot of people won’t understand this, because what we call “conservative” now is in opposition to political correctness, and would be principally called something approaching “liberal” (as in “classical liberal”). I’ve talked about this with people from the UK before, and it goes back to that old saying that the United States and England are two countries separated by a common language. What we call “liberal” now, in common parlance, would be called “conservative” in their country. It’s the idea of maintaining the status quo, or even the status quo ante; of shutting out, even shutting down, any new ideas, especially anything controversial. It’s a behavior that goes along with “consolidating gains,” which is adverse to anything that would upset the applecart.

O’Neill’s most powerful argument is in regards to environmentalism. He doesn’t like it, calling it an “apology for poverty,” a justification for preventing the rest of the world from developing as the West did. He notes that it conveniently avoids the charge of racism, because it’s able to point to an amorphous threat, justified by “science,” that inoculates the campaign from such charges.

The plot thickens when O’Neill talks about himself, because he calls himself a “Marxist/libertarian.” He “unpacks” that, and explains what he means is “the early Marx and Engels,” when he says they talked about freeing people from poverty, and from state diktat. He summed it up quoting Trotsky: “We have to increase the power of man over Nature, and decrease the power of man over man.” He also used the term “progressive,” but Nick Gillespie explained that what O’Neill called “progressive” is often what we would call “libertarian” in America. I don’t know what to make of him, but I found myself agreeing a lot with what he said in this interview, at least. He and I see much the same things going on, and I think he accurately voices why I oppose what I see as anti-modern sentiment in the West.

Edit 1/11/2016: Here’s a talk O’Neill gave with Nick Cater of the Centre for Independent Studies, called, “Age of Endarkenment,” where they contrast Enlightenment thought with what is the concern of “the elect” today. What he points out is the conflict between those who want ideas of progress to flourish and those who want to suppress societal progress has happened before. It happened pre-Enlightenment, and during the Enlightenment, and it will sound a bit familiar.

I’m going to quote a part of what he said, because I think it cuts to the chase of what this is really about. He echoes what I’ve learned as I’ve gotten older:

Now what we have is the ever-increasing encroachment of the state onto every aspect of our lives: How well we are, what our physical bodies are like, what we eat, what we drink, whether we smoke, where we can smoke, and even what we think, and what we can say. The Enlightenment was really, as Kant and others said, about encouraging people to take responsibility for their lives, and to grow up. Kant says all these “guardians” have made it seem extremely dangerous to be mature, and to be in control of your life. They’ve constantly told you that it’s extremely dangerous to run your own life. And he says you’ve got to ignore them, and you’ve got to dare to know. You’ve got to break free. That’s exactly what we’ve got to say now, because we have the return of these “guardians,” although they’re no longer kind of religious pointy-hatted people, but instead a kind of chattering class, and Greens, and nanny-staters, but they are the return of these “guardians” who are convincing us that it is extremely dangerous to live your life without expert guidance, without super-nannies telling you how to raise your children, without food experts telling you what to eat, without anti-smoking campaigners telling you what’s happening to your lungs. I think we need to follow Kant’s advice, and tell these guardians to go away, and to break free of that kind of state interference.

And one important point that [John Stuart] Mill makes in relation to all this is that even if people are a bit stupid, and make the wrong decisions when they’re running their life, he said even that is preferable to them being told what to do by the state or by experts. And the reason he says that’s preferable is because through doing that they use their moral muscles. They make a decision, they make a choice, and they learn from it. And in fact Mill says very explicitly that the only way you can become a properly responsible citizen, a morally responsible citizen, is by having freedom of choice, because it’s through that process, through the process of making a choice about your life that you can take responsibility for your life. He says if someone else is telling you how to live and how to think, and what to do, then you’re no better than an ape who’s following instructions. Spinoza makes the same point. He says you’re no better than a beast if you’re told what to think, and told what to say. And the only way you can become a man, or a woman these days as well–they have to be included, is if you are allowed to think for yourself to determine what your thought process should be, how you should live, and so on. So I think the irony of today, really Nick, is that we have these states who think they are making us more responsible by telling us not to do this, and not to do that, but in fact they’re robbing us of the ability to become responsible citizens. Because the only way you can become a responsible citizen is by being free, and by making a choice, and by using your moral muscles to decide what your life’s path should be.

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