The demise of Google Wave: Ignorance is not bliss.

I heard earlier this month that Google Wave was going to be shut down at the end of the year, because it was not a hit with academia (h/t to Mark Guzdial). I was surprised. What was interesting and rather shocking is one of the reasons it failed was that academics couldn’t figure out how to use it. They said it was too complex. In other words, the product required some training. I’ve used Wave and it’s about as easy to use as an e-mail application, though there are some extra concepts that need to be acquired to use it. I saw it as kind of a cross between e-mail and teleconferencing. Maybe if people had been told this they would’ve been able to pick up the concepts more easily. It’s hard for me to say.

I thought for sure Wave would be a hit somewhere. I assumed business and bloggers would adopt it. The local Lisp user group I’ve been attending has been using Wave for several months now, and we’ve made it an integral part of our meetings. I think we’ll get along without it, but we were sorry to hear that it’s going away.

As I’ve reflected on it I’ve realized that Wave has some significant shortcomings, though it was a promising technology. I first heard about it in a comment that was left on my blog a year ago in response to my post “Does computer science have a future?” Come to think of it, Google Wave’s fate is an interesting commentary on that topic. Anyway, I watched Google’s feature video where it was debuted. It reminded me a bit of Engelbart’s NLS from 1968, though it really didn’t hold a candle to NLS. It had a few similarities I could recognize, but its vision was much more limited. As the source article for this story reveals, the Google Wave team used the idea of extending the concept of e-mail as their inspiration, adding idioms of instant messaging to the metaphor. That explains some things. What I think is a shame is they could’ve done so much more with it. One thing I could think of right off the bat was having the ability to link between waves, and entries in different waves, so that people could refer back and forth to previous/subsequent conversations on related topics. I mean, how hard would that have been to add? In business terms wouldn’t this have “added value” to the product concept? What about bringing over an innovation from NLS and adding video conferencing? Maybe businesses would’ve found Wave appealing if it had some of these things. It’s hard to say, but apparently the Wave team didn’t think of them.

At our Lisp user group meeting last week we got to talking about the problems with Wave after we learned that it was going away. A topic that came up was that Google realized Wave was going to raise costs in computing resources, given the way it was designed, as a client/server model. All Waves originated on Google’s servers. An example I heard thrown out was that if one person had 10,000 friends all signed up on one wave, and they were all on there at the same time, every single keystroke made by one person would cause Google’s server to have to send the update to every one of the people signed up for the wave–10,000 people. There was something about how they couldn’t monetize the service effectively as well, especially for that kind of load.

As they talked about this it reminded me of what Alan Kay said about Engelbart’s NLS system at ETech 2003. NLS had a similar client/server system design to Google Wave. I remember he said that the scaling factor with NLS was 2N, because of its system architecture. This clearly was not going to scale well. It was perhaps because of this that several members of Engelbart’s team left to go work on the concept of personal computing at Xerox PARC. What they were after at PARC was a network scaling factor of N2, and the idea was they would accomplish this using a peer-to-peer architecture. I speculated that this tied in with the invention of Ethernet at PARC, which is a peer-to-peer networking scheme over TCP/IP. I remember Kay and a fellow engineer showed off the concept with Croquet at ETech. It was quite relevant to what I talk about here, actually, because the demo showed how updates of multiple graphical objects on one Squeak instance (Croquet was written in Squeak) were propagated very quickly to another instance over the network, without a mediating central server. And the scheme scaled to multiple computers on the same network.

Google Wave’s story is a sorry tale, a clear case where the industry’s collective ignorance of computer history has hurt technological progress. In this case it’s possible that one reason Wave did not go well is because the design team did not learn the lessons that had already been learned about 38 years ago.

—Mark Miller, https://tekkie.wordpress.com

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